Raymond Soltysek's Blog

“The Beauty that Brendan Sees”: “Chelsea Station”, Issue 3.

Posted in Publications by raymondsoltysek on August 6, 2012

Link to Chelsea Station

“Chelsea Station”, the New York literary magazine for gay writing, is out now.  At over 110 pages of writing, it’s a bumper edition of fiction, memoir, travel writing and poetry.  It’s available either as print or as downloadable pdf here.

It includes my story, “The Beauty that Brendan Sees”, which tells of the friendship between Brendan and Larry over twenty years.  I don’t usually pass comment on my own work, but it feels to me one of the best short stories I’ve ever written: certainly, it’s one of the gentlest, and is as near as I’ve ever got to being uplifting.

Here’s an extract to give a flavour:

He met Larry at Elazio’s cigar emporium off Madison Avenue in the days when he was young and searching for props to make him seem older, more distinguished, more masculine. He’d been fussing over some cheap cigars when he felt the big man loom up behind him, put a hand on his shoulder. “Hey, Elazio,” a booming voice said to the little wizened man behind the counter who resembled a nut-brown tobacco leaf, “looks like the young gentleman’s a beginner. Show him the good ones so he gets a real taste.” He winked at Brendan and shooed Elazio away to bring out some of the contrabands he’d got by a roundabout route through Canada from his wife’s cousin’s neighbour’s business in Havana. “No point not having the best, son,” he said, “and this place has the best, if you know how to look for it. Hell, the only thing this shop don’t have is a sweaty set of mulatto girl’s thighs. Not that I’d have much use else for them.” He smacked his lips in the lascivious way that Brendan soon discovered made everyone say, “Oh, Laurence!”

He rolls the cigar as he lights it, puff, puff, puff. It relaxes him and he realises he is looking forward to the end game. In the background, Amalia Rodriguez sings; he and Larry saw her once, long before that time she came to New York to kill herself and couldn’t do it. They watched her wring herself empty, and Larry said anyone that miserable had to be a dyke, but he was joking and he’d enjoyed it because he was content to wait with Brendan amongst a small knot of common people outside the stage door to get her autograph. She is singing a happy tune, light; Brendan doesn’t understand Portuguese, but he knows for sure it is about orange groves and beaches with little fishing boats dragged up on to the sand. Hearts are broken in fado, and hearts are mended; this is one of the mending songs.

“Hey, Brendan, you ever realise smoking cigars gave Cuba its name?” Larry once asked him.

“What do you mean?”

“Say coo.”

“What?”

“Go on. Say coo.”

“Coo.”

“Feel it? The shape your mouth makes?”

“Like a kiss.”

“Na, man. More like a suck. Now say baa.”

“Baa.”

“Just like exhaling. Coo-baa. Coo-baa. You say it every time you take a draw of you cigar.”

“Kind of oral, these Cubans.”

“Yeah,” he said. “Ain’t I the lucky one?”

At about a fiver for the digital issue, it’s well worth it.  With material from all over the world included, it’s another fine outlet for writers.  Take a look.

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